SV-Synchronicity
20Mar/140

Chinese New Year 2014

Just ahead of Chinese New Year 2014, I arrived on Phuket with a couple of extra free days before my friend Jacob would also arrive from Shanghai. A small list of repairs and improvements outlined tasks to fill the time. Phuket at this time was experiencing record low temperatures - down to low 20s (Celsius) at night.

Phi Phi Sunrise

Phi Phi Sunrise

During the 'free' time I installed more LED lighting throughout the boat - in the head, aft cabin, over the nav station and in the forward v-berth. In addition, I performed surgery on several of the white LED lights - to outfit them with an extra on/off switch and cluster of red LED lights. This way the head, saloon, and nav station can remain lit at night without any impact on night vision.

Out of this, my favorite LED addition is in the form of plastic encased (waterproof) strips of LEDs controlled by a IR remote. I installed these in a recess below the settee cushions in the saloon - so that they provide ambient light without being directly visible. Via remote these strips can be adjusted for brightness and color - literally emulating every color of the rainbow (also set to flash, oscillate, and behave like an insane disco). The best part is that they can be set to a dim red, which nicely illuminates the entire cabin at night. On Taobao (Chinese shopping site) these cost less than $15USD for a 2 meter strip with remote.

Beyond that, I added more 12v fans throughout the boat. Biggest impact on comfort was in the head, where a shower can now be had which is cool and refreshing - before, it was a miserable sauna. Why the previous owner didn't do this is beyond me. Then again, he'd filled the boat with 12v "computer fans," the sort found inside tower PC cases, which were barely effective. Those are all gone now.

Completely removed and cleaned the anchor chain, cut off 3 meters that were corroding in the bottom of the chain locker. Re-marked for depth, re-attached bitter end. As I was bringing the chain back onboard the windless jammed then broke. There's a metal chain guide that helps the chain come off the windless gear - and this had moved sideways, then jammed. The chain guide sits atop a hard plastic spacer. Discovered that the bolt holes holding this plate in place were stripped - likely due to corrosion between the SS bolts and aluminum windlass base.

Managed to clean the bolt holes, replace the (bent) bolts. Crammed a bunch of washers in between the spacer - and everything snugged down tight. This repair worked fine (at the marina and over the subsequent days of use). Have purchased thread repair kit and aluminum epoxy - one of these two things (or both in tandem!) should fix the issue more permanently; something I'll take care of on the next visit.

With repairs and improvements (mostly) done, I went to buy groceries and supplies. Tesco on Phuket is a 30 minute drive from the marina and has a wide selection of hardware, food, and other supplies. Hiring a car for the round trip (with the driving waiting for 1hr while shopping is done) costs ~1000baht (30USD). All the food and supplies for the trip cost a little over 100USD; this supplied breakfast, lunch, and dinner for two people for ~4 days.

Next day, Jacob arrived. We set off towards Koh Phanak. Light winds meant we had to motor sail. Arrived at Koh Phanak - same first night anchorage as was used on the previous trip (Anchorage Location). This time the tide was out, so where we'd previously found a cave that could be accessed and explored by dinghy, we instead found a muddy beach - the cave now inaccessible via dingy. We walked inside to explore, found we couldn't get very far - then had a difficult time escaping the muddy beach with our shoes (they kept getting sucked into the knee-deep mud). Emphasis here on MUD.

Here's a map showing our route - from the marina to a night at Koh Phanak. then to the Southern bay of Koh Yao Yai, then down to Phi Phi.

CNY Trip Route

CNY Trip Route

Next morning we motor sailed around the North end of Koh Phanak. Depth here (at low tide) showed ~0.1 meters for at least 20 minutes. I wasn't too worried about hitting the muddy bottom or getting stuck - the tide was set to rise.

Sailed down the East coast of Koh Yao Kai - flirting with the idea of heading to Koh Hong, but ultimately decided to press for an earlier arrival at the South bat of Koh Yao Yai, where we would anchor for the night (Anchorage Location). Due to a cross-wind and wave action, it was necessary to set a 2nd anchor off the stern quarter so that we could get the bow pointed into the waves. Things were *very* roll-y before the 2nd anchor was down.

Attempted snorkeling in the Southern bay, but found the reef off the western point completely dead and destroyed. Sad. There was an impressive brush fire burning on the island. Seems the region was suffering a severe drought during this time; pretty apparent if you've been to Thailand in the past and seen everything green and lush.

Next morning we headed to Koh Phi Phi. Had some good wind and made the trip in ~3 hours. Anchored in Tong Sai Bay (Anchorage Location). Went ashore for diesel, supplies, and lunch.

At this point, there was lots of uncertainty about how much fuel was being consumed. Would we have enough? Run out halfway back to the marina? Were we consuming 4+ liters per hour (which is apparently normal) or less? More? Ultimately, we calculated it must be in the ~2 liters per hour range @ RPMs of ~2.3k. This moves the boat at 4~5kts (depending on tide/current).

Tong Sai Bay is busy during the day with large numbers of big tourist boats coming and going. Lots of wake action to keep motion on the boat lively. Snorkeling here is really good though - we anchored within swimming distance of the reef on the western side of the bay.

We found diesel in a little back alley, bought 50 liters, contained in an odd array of laundry detergent bottles and other random jugs. A big mess was made while trying to refill the boat from these random containers. Some sort of handheld pump (with filter!) is badly needed for this. I noticed a huge amount of dirt and debris in the bottoms of all the containers.

Using the dinghy to head ashore for dinner, we ran smack into a coral head! The tide was out, sun was down - and we had no idea they were lurking about. No damage done. Lesson learned: There are coral heads waiting for you at low tide. Head towards shore slowly, use a flashlight at night - and don't head straight for the Eastern beach. Better to head straight up the center channel, then head left or right once nearer the shore.

At night the island is really noisy. Even anchored out in the bay it's easy to be disturbed by the light and sound coming from the beach-front bars and clubs. I remember Phi Phi from my first visit a decade prior - and it's change a LOT. Tourists are crammed into every square inch, there are shops everywhere - OK if you want to restock groceries - and the place literally stinks (probably accentuated by all the clean air being breathed for days on the boat).

We left Phi Phi early the next morning and headed back to Koh Yao Yai. With good wind, we made the West coast of Yao Yai in a few hours, then dropped anchor is a secluded bay (Anchorage Location). After the crowds, noise, and stink of Phi Phi we wanted to spend the final night far away from signs of civilization, and this bay was well suited to that desire.

I woke the next day with severe food poisoning, which I blame on Phi Phi. Thankfully, Jacob was able to get us back to the marina without any problems. If you're going to eat and drink on Phi Phi - stick to beer (in bottles) and food that's been thoroughly cooked. Avoid at all costs froofy drinks in oddly shaped glasses... but then I probably didn't have to tell you that.

On the next trip I'll continue upgrades and improvements - still some lights and fans to install. The sink drain in the head needs some attention (run new hose?). Need to replace or remove the salt water pressure faucet in the galley - the old faucet is corroded beyond recognition (salt water, yay).

Phuket Sailing (Chinese New Year 2014) from American McGee on Vimeo.

You can also see video of this adventure by clicking HERE.

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